Pondscum

“Can a thin person have body image struggles? Can a thin person be at war with their self-image? Can a thin person hate to look in the mirror?

Absolutely.

And does that suck?

Absolutely.

But the difference between these negative feelings and fatphobia is this: The only person worrying about whether or not I’m meeting beauty standards is me.

And that’s not the same for fat folk.

When you’re not thin, other people on the beach actually do take offense. When you’re not thin, people really do think that you shouldn’t be in a bathing suit. When you’re not thin, people really do make your body their moral obligation.

And while your internal struggle is real and significant, the point is: You might hate your body, but society doesn’t.

That’s thin privilege.”

—   

Let’s Talk About Thin Privilege — Everyday Feminism (via samanticshift)

You ain’t got people legitimately denying you job and educational opportunities because of the fact that you are thin.

You will not have people taking your picture in disgust and have them use it as ‘motivation’ to not be like you.

You are represented in all forms of media in an overwhelmingly POSITIVE light.

Plain and simple. There is no place in this world where thin people are not put up as the ideal.

So can we stop acting as if someone being individually teased for being skinny is the same as the systematic way that fat people are told their bodies are always wrong because morality?

(via knitmeapony)

(via jellyfishdirigible)

larklet:

roses—and—rue:

Zitkala-Ša, also known as Gertrude Simmons Bonnin, was the most amazing woman you’ve never heard of.
A writer, editor, musician, teacher and political activist, she was born on February 22, 1876 on the Yankton Indian Reservation in South Dakota. Her mother was Sioux and her father, who abandoned the family when she was very young, was European-American.
When she was eight, missionaries came to the res and took Zitkala-Ša along with several other children to the White’s Manual Labor Institute in Wabash, Indiana, one of many such institutions where Native children were forced to assimilate into white American culture. She studied piano and violin and eventually took the place of her teacher when she resigned. When she received her diploma in 1895, she delivered a speech on women’s rights.
She earned a scholarship to Earlham College, where she continued to study music. From 1897-99, she played with the New England Conservatory in Boston and played at the Paris Exposition in 1900. She collaborated with composer William F. Hanson on the world’s first Native American opera, based entirely on Sioux melodies that had previously existed only as oral tradition. She would play the melodies and Hanson transcribed them. The Sun Dance Opera debuted in 1913 to warm reviews, but I can find no recordings of it, and it seems it’s never performed.
Zitkala-Ša also wrote a number of collections of Native American stories and legends. She wrote them in Latin when she was at school and then translated them into English. She was the first Native person to do so in her own words, without a white editor or translator. In addition, she wrote extensively about her schooling and how it left her torn between her Sioux heritage and her assimilation into white culture. Her writings were published in The Atlantic Monthly and in Harper’s and she served as editor for the American Indian Magazine.
Unsurprisingly, most of her writings were political. She was a fierce yet charismatic advocate for Native American rights. Her efforts helped pass the Indian Citizenship Act and the Indian Reorganization Act. Having founded the National Coalition of American Indians, she spent the rest of her life fighting to protect our many indigenous communities from exploitation.
Her accomplishments were incredible- but have you ever heard of her? I had never heard of her either. Just another example of a history-changing woman omitted from the history books.

larklet:

roses—and—rue:

Zitkala-Ša, also known as Gertrude Simmons Bonnin, was the most amazing woman you’ve never heard of.

A writer, editor, musician, teacher and political activist, she was born on February 22, 1876 on the Yankton Indian Reservation in South Dakota. Her mother was Sioux and her father, who abandoned the family when she was very young, was European-American.

When she was eight, missionaries came to the res and took Zitkala-Ša along with several other children to the White’s Manual Labor Institute in Wabash, Indiana, one of many such institutions where Native children were forced to assimilate into white American culture. She studied piano and violin and eventually took the place of her teacher when she resigned. When she received her diploma in 1895, she delivered a speech on women’s rights.

She earned a scholarship to Earlham College, where she continued to study music. From 1897-99, she played with the New England Conservatory in Boston and played at the Paris Exposition in 1900. She collaborated with composer William F. Hanson on the world’s first Native American opera, based entirely on Sioux melodies that had previously existed only as oral tradition. She would play the melodies and Hanson transcribed them. The Sun Dance Opera debuted in 1913 to warm reviews, but I can find no recordings of it, and it seems it’s never performed.

Zitkala-Ša also wrote a number of collections of Native American stories and legends. She wrote them in Latin when she was at school and then translated them into English. She was the first Native person to do so in her own words, without a white editor or translator. In addition, she wrote extensively about her schooling and how it left her torn between her Sioux heritage and her assimilation into white culture. Her writings were published in The Atlantic Monthly and in Harper’s and she served as editor for the American Indian Magazine.

Unsurprisingly, most of her writings were political. She was a fierce yet charismatic advocate for Native American rights. Her efforts helped pass the Indian Citizenship Act and the Indian Reorganization Act. Having founded the National Coalition of American Indians, she spent the rest of her life fighting to protect our many indigenous communities from exploitation.

Her accomplishments were incredible- but have you ever heard of her? I had never heard of her either. Just another example of a history-changing woman omitted from the history books.

(via thegeekgirlwhatrules)

http://jellyfishdirigible.tumblr.com/post/96196389948/corpsereviver2-why-women-dont-apply-for-jobs

corpsereviver2:

Why Women Don’t Apply for Jobs Unless They’re 100% Qualified

prettyarbitrary:

This is a REALLY INTERESTING article not only from a career standpoint, but also when it comes to looking at differences between how men and…

dontbearuiner:

krumla:

How can you make the two greatest assassins in the universe completely useless and boring?

Oh man.

I loved GotG, but this is fantastic and true.

(via jellyfishdirigible)

tumblingtheology:

bookishboi:

lastrealindians:

Teen scientist harnesses sun power to help Navajo community
New Mexico teen Raquel Redshirt uses everyday materials and the sun to build solar ovens, fulfilling a Navajo community need and winning an award at the Intel ISEF competition.
Growing up on New Mexico’s Navajo Nation, Raquel Redshirt was well aware of the needs of her community. Many of her impoverished neighbors lacked basics such as electricity, as well as stoves and ovens to cook food.
Though resources in the high desert are limited, Raquel realized one was inexhaustible: the sun. “That’s where I got the idea of building a solar oven,” the teen says.
She researched solar ovens and found that most incorporate mirrors or other expensive materials. Raquel wanted to create a design that anyone could easily afford and replicate, using readily available materials.
READ MORE HERE: http://lrinspire.com/2014/06/19/teen-scientist-harnesses-sun-power-to-help-navajo-community/

Yes!!

GO NEW MEXICO! GO NAVAJO NATION! GO BRILLIANT TEENAGE GIRLS!

tumblingtheology:

bookishboi:

lastrealindians:

Teen scientist harnesses sun power to help Navajo community

New Mexico teen Raquel Redshirt uses everyday materials and the sun to build solar ovens, fulfilling a Navajo community need and winning an award at the Intel ISEF competition.

Growing up on New Mexico’s Navajo Nation, Raquel Redshirt was well aware of the needs of her community. Many of her impoverished neighbors lacked basics such as electricity, as well as stoves and ovens to cook food.

Though resources in the high desert are limited, Raquel realized one was inexhaustible: the sun. “That’s where I got the idea of building a solar oven,” the teen says.

She researched solar ovens and found that most incorporate mirrors or other expensive materials. Raquel wanted to create a design that anyone could easily afford and replicate, using readily available materials.

READ MORE HERE: http://lrinspire.com/2014/06/19/teen-scientist-harnesses-sun-power-to-help-navajo-community/

Yes!!

GO NEW MEXICO! GO NAVAJO NATION! GO BRILLIANT TEENAGE GIRLS!

(via jellyfishdirigible)

Alan Alda: 'If We Could Eradicate Polio, Why Can't We Eradicate Misogyny?'

berlynn-wohl:

mashmoments:

Alan Alda talking about misogyny and nailing it

This man — who is the most wonderful amazing human being on the planet, by the way — skirted very close to dropping some serious fucking knowledge in this video, and I don’t know why he didn’t do it, but I’m going to:

In 1943, when he was seven years old, Alan Alda contracted polio. At the time, the standard treatment for the disease was to immobilize one’s limbs by strapping them to planks, to prevent muscle contractions and deformity. The splints had the unfortunate side effect, however, of causing muscle atrophy due to lack of use. So Alan’s parents instead decided to subject him to a new (and admittedly painful) treatment that had been developed by a nurse named Sister Elizabeth Kenny: extremely hot woolen blankets applied to the limbs, accompanied by a regiment of muscle-stretching.

Sister Elizabeth’s treatment was basically the exact opposite of what the medical establishment (all men at the time, obvs) recommended. And that establishment — when they acknowledged her technique at all — referred to it as a “grievous error and fraught with grave danger.”

But those doctors who were skeptical of her technique had their minds changed when they actually deigned to observe the results in patients. Wow, that’s so odd: it’s almost as if they discounted Sister Kenny’s methods without knowing anything about them save that the person who developed them was a woman. Hmm.

Alan Alda attributes not only his full recovery from polio to her treatment, but also his being a feminist — because, as he mentioned in the video, a deadly disease that he contracted was successfully combated because men and women were working to fight it.

(via jellyfishdirigible)

zooophagous:

North American River Otters

(via thefrogman)

But then, the truth was never really the point. Thin women don’t tell their fat friends ‘You’re not fat’ because they’re confused about the dictionary definition of the word, or their eyes are broken, or they were raised on planets where size 24 is the average for women. They don’t say it because it’s the truth. They say it because fat does not mean just fat in this culture. It can also mean any or all of the following:

Ugly
Unhealthy
Smelly
Lazy
Ignorant
Undisciplined
Unlovable
Burdensome
Embarrassing
Unfashionable
Mean
Angry
Socially inept
Just plain icky

So when they say ‘You’re not fat,’ what they really mean is ‘You’re not a dozen nasty things I associate with the word fat.’ The size of your body is not what’s in question; a tape measure or a mirror could solve that dispute. What’s in question is your goodness, your lovability, your intelligence, your kindness, your attractiveness. And your friends, not surprisingly, are inclined to believe you get high marks in all those categories. Ergo, you couldn’t possibly be fat.

—   

Kate Harding (via rhiannon-random)

another example of thin privilege, your body type doesn’t carry these negative synonyms

(via fatcatsandcurls)

Boy howdy it sure is frustrating when I say “It’s hard for me to find cool clothes on the rack in sizes that fit me” and my very slim friends say “Oh shut up it is not” It’s like, Wow, that is fascinating, I had no idea you had more experience shopping for my body than I do! Like, all these negative terms are so intrinsically associated with heavyset bodies that my small friends tell me I’m wrong when I say it’s difficult shopping in trendy boutiques where 80% of the stuff on the racks in a size 4, because they get the idea that that pretending I have the ability to squeeze into tiny clothes for tiny people will make me feel better about myself.

(via coelasquid)

Reblag for da post

(Source: catholicaramis, via coelasquid)

blusterousiris:

Robyn Lawley, Jada Sezer, and Gabi Gregg for Swimsuits For All. 

(via coelasquid)

WORBLA IS BEING SOLD IN THE U.S.

teddybearbones:

heatgunning:

blackbanshee:

no more $20 shipping!! there are STORES yes STORES where you can buy official worbla now!!

see for yourself!

Atlanta, GA

Metairie, LA

Omaha, NE

Austin, TX

Conroe, TX

Jacksonville, FL

Burbank, CA

Canada too!

Winnipeg,…